Not The Best, But learning every day.

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by dammit-dan 2 months ago.

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  • #625

    senseishaggy
    Participant

    My name is Sensei Shaggy, an adequately versatile lyricist. Starting a general discussion on freestyling and the how to’s, Because personally i think the most disheartening thing about freestyling is in the beginning and intermediate levels of skill the concept of style is loosely explored. And i do believe that it is the most important aspect of Rapping in general, I.E. Why people like chance, or Eminem seem so fresh with such inspired skill, as opposed to their predecessors. Is they took time to develop a style of their own. The best advice on the topic is Practice, but not only practicing in the sense of thinking of new words, but thinking of a central theme, style, rhyme scheme, pronunciation, voice. Whatever, those are the things that stand out in sound, Dope lyrics are awesome but anyone can pick up a dictionary and learn new words. It takes real dedication to turn words into art. And I personally believe this is the hardest part, or the struggle for becoming adept and really intrigued by what you can come up with. It’s an exploration and taming of your subconscious thoughts.

    • This topic was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by senseishaggy.
    #632

    SuperStrangeLoop
    Keymaster

    Sensei Shaggy, you’re the man! Thx for being first to dive into the forum, even though there’s not much water *yet*! Your bold move will be remembered for many freestyles to come lol.

    More to the point, I also have a hunch that freestyle it is the most important aspect of rapping, as you say. IMO a background in freestyling tends to produce the most skilled rappers. What makes a rapper “good” is too subjective to really pin down, which is why I say “skilled”. By “skilled” I sorta mean:

    • The ability to flow in a way that conveys greater feeling & soul by mimicking natural human speech
    • The reciprocal ability to read a beat well and rework the flow according to the will of the instrumental, so to speak

    “…to turn words into art… intrigued by what you can come up with… taming your subconscious thoughts.” Yes! Beautifully said. That’s exactly what freestyling is, to a lot of people. I also think it’s a tragically misunderstood art form, but I’ll save that rant for another post lol.

    — SSL

    #675

    wes6th
    Participant

    In my opinion freestyling is a stream of consciousness. It’s a way to stay sharp and prove to people that you are a MC. Is it the “most important aspect” I don’t believe it to be “the most important aspect” but it’s one of the elements of being an MC. To be able to take a word and flip it and wow people is an amazing ability. But I truly think, what people really respect is the songs in and your lyrics. You just sit there and drop bars all day, but if you can’t move people or Inspire them with a feeling, then what are you being an artist for

    #685

    dammit-dan
    Moderator

    Oh shit. We have a typer. It’s nice not being the only one lol. I agree wholeheartedly with almost everything, I personally found my own style and voice and all that but I let it all occur naturally through neverending dedication adn practice. I think to try to steer your style, is a method that will more likely lead you to sound like those rappers in which you aleady have heard. It may just be me. But I had no way of predicting or planning my naturally evolved style. It’s heavily rooted in simply letting my subconscious run the show.

    There is nothing more interesting than knowing you got skill, but you have no real control of it. It just happens as you go. OR, as I go.

    I have so much advice from almost 2 decades of mostly writing until these past 3 or so years in which i quit writing and never looked back.

    I’m about to rap right now, but when I got time I’ll come back and share some insight.

    #686

    dammit-dan
    Moderator

    I have found that the average hip hop listener isn’t quite as concerned with the complexiities of the nuances of spontaneous poetic displays of skill, and it wasn’t until I began developing my vocals that I began to get much respect.

    Something I see in many rookies, is a lack of beat riding flow. You gotta match the beat. Its esay to wanna go faster as you may think that speed is important. I once thought so too. But You can pause to think a moment, if you time it right, the silence can be pretty powrful

    #687

    dammit-dan
    Moderator

    I have found that the average hip hop listener isn’t quite as concerned with the complexiities of the nuances of spontaneous poetic displays of skill, and it wasn’t until I began developing my vocals that I began to get much respect.

    Something I see in many rookies, is a lack of beat riding flow. You gotta match the beat. Its esay to wanna go faster as you may think that speed is important. I once thought so too. But You can pause to think a moment, if you time it right, the silence can be pretty powrful

    #688

    dammit-dan
    Moderator

    hey so i don’t think my replies indicate to whom I was replying. i may be wrong, but they look out of place on my screen

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